Advancements in Remote Communication: Telstra Integrates LEOsat Technology

In a significant leap forward for remote connectivity, Telstra has successfully conducted its first call using low earth orbit satellite (LEOsats) technology from Eutelsat’s OneWeb network. This inaugural call was made from a mobile base station located in Oxford Falls, a suburb in northern Sydney. As part of an agreement inked in June 2023, the Australian telecommunications giant is set to upgrade over 300 remote mobile base stations with LEOsat backhaul within 18 months, marking the largest endeavor of its kind.

Having commenced the construction of OneWeb teleports since March 2022, Telstra reported its anticipation of providing remote areas with improved network resilience, notably in regions where natural disasters could disrupt traditional backhaul connections. The new satellite system is expected to deliver speeds up to 25Gbps and substantially reduce latency, achieving a tenfold decrease in communication delays. Currently, OneWeb LEOsats offer a round trip latency of 50-70 milliseconds, contrasting with the 250 milliseconds latency frequently experienced with conventional geostationary satellites.

These enhancements not only promise augmented service level agreements and committed information rates for users but also pave the way for significant performance improvements. Remote locations will gain access to communications up to 15 times faster than previously available and witness a substantial upgrade in reliability and latency. This pivotal shift in backhaul technology underscores Telstra’s commitment to bringing robust, high-speed connectivity to the furthest reaches of its network.

FAQ Section

What technology did Telstra use to make its first successful remote call?
Telstra conducted its first call using low earth orbit satellite (LEOsats) technology from Eutelsat’s OneWeb network.

Where was the first call made using this technology?
The call was made from a mobile base station in Oxford Falls, a suburb in northern Sydney.

What is Telstra’s plan for upgrading with LEOsat backhaul?
Telstra intends to upgrade over 300 remote mobile base stations within 18 months as part of an agreement.

What are the anticipated benefits of the OneWeb LEOsats for remote areas?
OneWeb LEOsats are expected to provide improved network resilience, higher speeds up to 25Gbps, substantially lower latency, and better performance in remote locations.

How does the latency of OneWeb LEOsats compare to conventional geostationary satellites?
OneWeb LEOsats offer latency of 50-70 milliseconds as opposed to the 250 milliseconds commonly experienced with conventional geostationary satellites.

What improvements will remote locations experience?
Communications in remote locations will be up to 15 times faster, with a substantial upgrade in reliability and latency.

What does the introduction of LEOsat technology signify for Telstra?
This marks Telstra’s commitment to providing robust, high-speed connectivity to the furthest reaches of its network.

Definitions

LEOsats (Low Earth Orbit Satellites): Satellites that orbit at altitudes of 2,000 kilometers or less above the Earth, leading to reduced communication latency compared to higher-orbiting geostationary satellites.

Backhaul: The intermediate link between the core network, or backbone, and the small subnetworks at the edge of the entire hierarchical network.

Geostationary Satellites: Satellites that orbit the Earth at the equatorial plane at a height of approximately 35,786 kilometers, remaining stationary relative to the Earth’s surface.

Latency: The delay before a transfer of data begins following an instruction for its transfer.

Service Level Agreements (SLAs): Formal agreements documenting a service provider’s commitment to performance standards, including reliability and response time.

Committed Information Rate (CIR): The guaranteed data transfer rate agreed upon between a service provider and a customer.

Related Links

Telstra

Eutelsat

OneWeb

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